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dc.rights.licenseAll article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Eleanor
dc.contributor.authorStuart-Smith, Jane
dc.contributor.authorScobbie, James M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:53:34Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:53:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-26
dc.identifierER5280
dc.identifier.citationLawson, E., Stuart-Smith, J. & Scobbie, J. M. (2018) The role of gesture delay in coda /r/ weakening: An articulatory, auditory and acoustic study. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 143 (3), pp. 1646-1657.
dc.identifier.issn1520-8524
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.5027833
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/5280
dc.description.abstractThe cross-linguistic tendency of coda consonants to weaken, vocalize, or be deleted is shown to have a phonetic basis, resulting from gesture reduction, or variation in gesture timing. This study investigates the effects of the timing of the anterior tongue gesture for coda /r/ on acoustics and perceived strength of rhoticity, making use of two sociolects of Central Scotland (working-class and middle-class) where coda /r/ is weakening and strengthening respectively. Previous articulatory analysis revealed a strong tendency for these sociolects to use different coda /r/ tongue configurations - working-class and middle-class speakers tend to use tip/front raised and bunched variants respectively; however, this finding does not explain working-class /r/ weakening. A correlational analysis in the current study showed a robust relationship between anterior lingual gesture timing, F3, and percept of rhoticity. A linear mixed effects regression analysis showed that both speaker social class and linguistic factors (word structure and the checked/unchecked status of the prerhotic vowel) had significant effects on tongue gesture timing and formant values. This study provides further evidence that gesture delay can be a phonetic mechanism for coda rhotic weakening and apparent loss, but social class emerges as the dominant factor driving lingual gesture timing variation.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by Economic and Social Research Council Grant Nos. RES-062-23-3246 and ES-N008189-1.
dc.format.extent1646-1657
dc.publisherAcoustical Society of America
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 The Authors
dc.titleThe role of gesture delay in coda /r/ weakening: An articulatory, auditory and acoustic study
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.date.updated2019-01-28
dc.description.facultycasl
dc.description.volume143
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.1121/1.5027833
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid5280
rioxxterms.typearticle
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.publicationdate2018-03-26
refterms.dateAccepted2018-03-06
refterms.dateFCA2018-04-02
refterms.dateFCD2018-03-28
qmu.authorLawson, Eleanor
qmu.authorScobbie, James M.
qmu.centreCASL
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number3
refterms.versionAM


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