Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFinkel, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorDanby, Paula
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T15:21:50Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T15:21:50Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-08
dc.identifierER5397
dc.identifier.citationFinkel, R. & Danby, P. (2018) Legitimizing leisure experiences as emotional work: A post-humanist approach to gendered equine encounters. Gender, Work & Organization (In Press).
dc.identifier.issn0968-6673
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gwao.12268
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/5397
dc.description** From Crossref via Jisc Publications Router. ** Licence for VoR version of this article starting on 08-06-2018: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Finkel, R. & Danby, P. (2018) Legitimizing leisure experiences as emotional work: A post-humanist approach to gendered equine encounters. Gender, Work & Organization (In Press), which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/gwao.12268. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
dc.description.abstractDue to changes in lifestyle and work patterns, education and values associated with wellbeing, non‐human animals are now incorporated into a range of human experiences and environments. This research specifically focuses on human–equine relations, examining blurred boundaries between therapeutic and recreational interspecies encounters. It is acknowledged that human–equine relations are often gendered and this research focuses mainly on women's narratives. Viewed through the post‐humanist lens, horses now form kinship and companionship roles, particularly for women, where relations have become mutually emotionally dependent as a result of interspecies communication and embodied encounters. Research utilizes feminist post‐humanist and cultural politics of emotion frameworks associate with the co‐agency on the co‐agency of animals. Embedded in the concept of equiscapes, or post‐humanist leisure spaces, research methods employ qualitative approaches, including in‐depth interviews, participant diaries and multispecies ethnography. Findings reveal how women make considerable investments in equine activities, which develops mutual welfare and wellbeing. Yet, despite these benefits, emotional and other expenditures are justified in work discourses to legitimize them as valuable to themselves, their families and their communities.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofGender, Work & Organization
dc.subjectEquestrianism
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectHuman-Animal Relations
dc.subjectLeisure
dc.subjectPosthumanism
dc.titleLegitimizing leisure experiences as emotional work: A post-humanist approach to gendered equine encounters
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultydiv_BaM
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.1111/gwao.12268
dc.description.ispublishedaheadofprint
dc.description.eprintid5397
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateAccepted2018-04-16
refterms.dateEmbargoEnd2020-06-08
refterms.dateFCD2018-06-18
qmu.authorDanby, Paula
qmu.authorFinkel, Rebecca
dc.description.statusaheadofprint
refterms.versionAM


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record