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dc.contributor.authorCarin-Levy, Gail
dc.contributor.authorKendall, Marilyn
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Archie
dc.contributor.authorMead, Gillian
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:41:57Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:41:57Z
dc.date.issued2009-04
dc.identifierER597
dc.identifier.citationCarin-Levy, G., Kendall, M., Young, A. & Mead, G. (2009) The psychosocial effects of exercise and relaxation classes for persons surviving a stroke, Canadian journal of occupational therapy. Revue canadienne d'ergoth̩rapie, vol. 76, , pp. 73-80,
dc.identifier.issnAug-74
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/000841740907600204
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/597
dc.description.abstractBackground. This study was set up to explore unexpected findings emergent from a randomized controlled trial of exercise versus relaxation post-stroke. Purpose. Stroke survivors' experiences of taking part in exercise and relaxation classes were explored. Methods. In-depth, semi-structured interviews carried out with 14 community-dwelling stroke survivors in Edinburgh. The informants previously participated in a randomized exploratory trial of exercise versus relaxation. Findings. The classes motivated participants to take part in other purposeful activities, to continue to practice what they had learned, and/or to attend another class in the community. Class participation also led to an improvement of self-perceived quality of life, specifically, improved confidence, physical ability, psychosocial functioning, and a sense of empowerment. Implications. Taking part in either exercise or relaxation classes after stroke can contribute to improved self-perceived quality of life, improved psychosocial functioning, and improved motivation to take an active role in the recovery process. Rsum Description. Cette tude a t mene en vue d'examiner les rsultats imprvus d'un essai contrl alatoire comportant des sances d'exercice et des sances de relaxation chez des patients ayant subi un accident vasculaire crbral (AVC). But. Les expriences vcues par des survivants d'un AVC ayant particip des sances d'exercice ou des sances de relaxation ont t tudies. Mthodologie. Des entrevues en profondeur semi-structures ont t menes auprs de 14 survivants d'un AVC vivant dans la collectivit Edinburgh. Les informateurs avaient particip auparavant un essai exploratoire alatoire comportant des sances d'exercice et des sances de relaxation. Rsultats. Les sances motivaient les participants participer d'autres activits significatives, continuer de mettre en pratique ce qu'ils avaient appris ou assister d'autres cours dans la communaut. La participation ces sances a galement permis aux participants d'amliorer leur perception face leur qualit de vie, en particulier d'amliorer leur confiance, leurs habilets physiques et leur fonctionnement psychosocial et d'avoir un sentiment de pouvoir sur leur vie. Consquences. La participation des sances d'exercice ou de relaxation la suite d'un AVC peut contribuer l'amlioration de la perception de la qualit de vie, du fonctionnement psychosocial et de la motivation participer activement au processus de rtablissement.
dc.format.extent73-80
dc.publisherCanadian Association of Occupational Therapists
dc.relation.ispartofCanadian journal of occupational therapy. Revue canadienne d'ergothrapie
dc.subjectSTROKE
dc.subjectEXERCISE
dc.subjectRELAXATION
dc.subjectQUALITATIVE STUDY
dc.subjectPSYCHOSOCIAL BENEFITS
dc.titleThe psychosocial effects of exercise and relaxation classes for persons surviving a stroke
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_occ
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dc.description.volume76
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.1177/000841740907600204
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid597
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorCarin-Levy, Gail
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number2


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