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dc.contributor.authorJagadamma, Kavi
dc.contributor.authorCoutts, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tom
dc.contributor.authorHerman, J.
dc.contributor.authorYirrell, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.authorForbes, L.
dc.contributor.authorvan der Linden, Marietta
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:45:17Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:45:17Z
dc.date.issued2009-10-12
dc.identifierER637
dc.identifier.citationJagadamma, K., Coutts, F., Mercer, T., Herman, J., Yirrell, J., Forbes, L. & van der Linden, M. (3909) Effects of tuning of ankle foot orthoses-footwear combination using wedges on stance phase knee hyperextension in children with cerebral palsy-Preliminary results, Disability and Rehabilitation Assistive Technology, vol. 4, pp. 406-413.
dc.identifier.issn17483107
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17483100903104774
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/637
dc.description.abstractPurpose. This pilot study investigated the feasibility of reducing stance phase knee hyperextension in children with cerebral palsy by tuning the ankle foot orthoses-footwear combination (AFO-FC) using different sizes of wedges. Methods. Five children with cerebral palsy underwent three dimensional gait analysis and tuning of their AFO-FC using wedges. Data analysis was carried out by comparing relevant gait parameters between the non-tuned and tuned prescription. Results. Knee hyperextension during stance significantly decreased, and the shank to vertical angle was closer to normal after tuning. Although none of the other parameters showed statistically significant changes, the wide confidence intervals and lack of power indicated the likelihood of a type II error. Further, it was noted that the influence of tuning on temporalspatial parameters was different between children with diplegia and those with hemiplegia. It was estimated that a sample size of 15 is required to detect significant changes at p_0.05 and power of 0.8. Conclusions. The findings of this study clearly indicate the potential clinical utility of tuning using wedges to correct knee hyperextension during the stance phase in children with cerebral palsy. However, observations support the need for an adequately powered study to assess the long-term effects of tuning on gait parameters, activity level and quality of life.
dc.format.extent406-413
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofDisability and Rehabilitation Assistive Technology
dc.subjectTuning
dc.subjectCerebral Palsy
dc.subjectAnkle Foot Orthoses
dc.subjectGait
dc.subjectGait Analysis
dc.titleEffects of tuning of ankle foot orthoses-footwear combination using wedges on stance phase knee hyperextension in children with cerebral palsy-Preliminary results
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_phy
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dc.description.volume4
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.3109/17483100903104774
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid637
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorvan der Linden, Marietta
qmu.authorJagadamma, Kavi
qmu.authorCoutts, Fiona
qmu.authorMercer, Tom
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number6


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