Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorReino, Sofia
dc.contributor.authorSchrder, Monika
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T20:21:04Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T20:21:04Z
dc.date.issued2009-06-26
dc.identifierER650
dc.identifier.citationReino, S. & Schr̦der, M. (2009) Consumer-driven sustainable tourism: towards incospicuos consumption., , , , ,
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/650
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Life in the typical affluent modern market economy is associated with high spending power and extensive consumer choice. Social comparison, competition and rivalry at work, and stress all drive consumer choice (Layard, 2005). The resultant status race is invariably associated with conspicuous consumption (Veblen, 1899), i.e. consumption that is demonstrative and signals an individual's position in the social pecking order. Consumer satisfaction with goods, services and experiences is derived from one of several types of consumer value, which are either extrinsically or intrinsically motivated. Extrinsic value may be understood as a means to some end, whereas intrinsic value is enjoyed for its own sake (Holbrook, 1999). Another characteristic of extrinsic value is that it can be pursued deliberately, as is typical for conspicuous consumption. Recreational activities offer opportunities for people to rebalance their lives through less conspicuous consumption, associated with more intrinsic consumer value. However, as intrinsic consumption value is more transitory, less predictable and less self-conscious than extrinsic value, products designed to deliver it present a particular challenge, nowhere more so than in terms of branding and marketing. This is exacerbated where tourism is concerned, because consumption takes place away from the familiar home environment and because it is not routine. Thus the tourist is likely to be in a
dc.titleConsumer-driven sustainable tourism: towards incospicuos consumption.
dc.typeconference_item
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultydiv_BaM
dc.description.referencetextBansal, P. & Roth, K. (2000); Why companies go green: a model of ecological responsiveness. Academy of Management Journal 43(4), 717-736 Bhaskaran, S., Polonsky, M., Cary, J. & Fernandez, S. (2006). Environmentally sustainable food production and marketing: Opportunity or hype? British Food Journal 108(8), 677-690 Burkart, A.J. & Medlik, S. (1974). Tourism: Past, Present and Future. London: Heinemann Butler, R.W. (1999). Sustainable tourism: a state-of-the-art review. Tourism Geographies 1(1), 7-25 Eagles, P. (1992). The travel motivations of Canadian ecotourists. Journal of Travel Research 31(2), 3-13 Fennel, D. (2006). Tourism Ethics. Frankfurt: Channel View Publications. Font, X. (ed.) Tourism Ecolabelling: Certification and Promotion of Sustainable Management (pp 41-55). Oxon: CABI Publishing Hall, C.M. & Page, S.J. (2006). The Geography of Tourism and Recreation: Environment, Place and Space. London: Routledge Halpern, D. (2005). Social Capital. Cambridge: Polity Harris, S.M. (2007). Does sustainability sell? Market responses to sustainability certification. Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal 18(1), 50-60 Holbrook, M.B. (1999). Introduction to consumer value. In: Holbrook, MB (ed.). Consumer Value. A framework for analysis and research (pp. 1-28.). London: Routledge Hunter, C. (1995). On the need to re-conceptualise sustainable tourism development. Journal of Sustainable Tourism 3(1995), 155-165 Hunter, C. (1997). Sustainable tourism as an adaptive paradigm. Annals of Tourism Research 24(4), 850-67 Hvenegaard, G.T. & Dearder, P. (2002). Ecotourism versus tourism in a Thai National Park. Annals of Tourism Research, 24(3), 700-720 Jones, P., Comfort, D., Hillier, D. & Eastwood, I. (2005). Retailers and sustainable development in the UK. International Journal of Retail and Distribution Management, 33(3), 207-214 Kassaye, W.W. (2001). Green Dilema. Marketing Intelligence and Planning 19(6), 444-455 Layard, R. (2005). Happiness. Lessons from a New Science. London: Allen Lane. Schwartz, S.H and Bardi, A. (2001). Value hierarchies across cultures. Journal of Cross Cultural Psychology, 32, 268-290 Sharpley, R. (2001). The Consumer Behaviour Context of Ecolabelling. In Font, X. (ed.) Tourism Ecolabelling: Certification and Promotion of Sustainable Management (pp 41-55). Oxon: CABI Publishing Swarbrook, J. & Horne, S. (2007). Consumer Behaviour in Tourism (2nd ed.). Oxford: Elsevier Veblen, T. (1899). The Theory of the Leisure Class. New York: Random House Witherspoon, S. (1994). The greening of Britain: romance and rationality. In: Jowell, R., Curtis, J., Brook, L. & Arendt, D. (eds.). British Social Attitudes: the 11th Report - The End of Conservative Values (pp 107-139). Aldershot: Dartmouth. World Commission on Environment and Development (cited as WCED) (1987). Our Common Future. Oxford University Press. Oxford, England, UK
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid650
rioxxterms.typeconference_item
qmu.authorSchrder, Monika
qmu.authorReino, Sofia
dc.description.statusunpub


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record