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dc.contributor.authorStephen, Christine
dc.contributor.authorCope, Peter
dc.contributor.authorOberski, Iddo
dc.contributor.authorShand, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:45:23Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:45:23Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifierER696
dc.identifier.citationStephen, C., Cope, P., Oberski, I. & Shand, P. (2008) They should try to find out what the children like;exploring engagement in childhood, Scottish Educational Review, vol. 40, , pp. 17-28,
dc.identifier.issn0141-9072
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/696
dc.description.abstractThis paper is an account of an exploratory study of the perspectives children and teachers hold about the learning experiences and pedagogical activities which engage primary and secondary school learners. The investigation was prompted by the apparent contrast between the enthusiastic, self-initiated engagement observed in preschool playrooms and the efforts teachers report as necessary to engage older pupils. A review of our interrogation of the literature on disposition to learn and motivation is followed by a description of our empirical work to explore the ways in which the main actors in classrooms make sense of engagement in learning. Our findings suggest that for the children engagement stems from active involvement, enhanced by a perception that there is some scope for freedom of action and opportunity for choice. On the other hand, the perspectives of the teachers were focused on participation in learning activities selected and led by the teacher and carried out in a way which meets the adults' expectations.
dc.format.extent17-28
dc.publisherUniversity of Stirling
dc.relation.ispartofScottish Educational Review
dc.titleThey should try to find out what the children like;exploring engagement in childhood
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultyCAP
dc.description.referencetextBronfrenbrenner, U. (1979) The Ecology of Human Development, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press Brown, S. & McIntyre, D. (1993) Making Sense of Teaching, Buckingham: Open University Press Candy P.C., Crebert, G. & O'Leary, J. (1994) Developing Lifelong Learning through Undergraduate Education, Canberra: Canberra Board of Employment, Education and Training Carr, M. & Claxton, G. (2002) Tracking the development of learning dispositions, Assessment in Education, 9 (1), 9-37 Claxton, G. & Carr, M. (2004) A framework for teaching learning: the dynamics of disposition, Early Years, 24 (1), 87-97 Coffield, F (2002) Skills for the future: I've got a little list, Assessment in Education, 9 (1), 39-43 Drnyei, Z. (1998) Motivation in second and foreign language learning, Language Teaching, 31, 117-135 Elliot, A. J. (1999) Approach and avoidance motivation and achievement goals, Educational Psycholgist, 34, 164-189 Fredericks, J. A., Blumenfeld, P.C. & Paris A. H. (2004) School Engagement: Potential of the Concept, State of the Evidence, Review of Educational Research, 74 (1), 59-109 Harlen, W. & Crick, D. R. (2003) Testing and Motivation for Learning, Assessment in Education, 10 (2), 169-207 Hughes, C (2004) New times? New learners? New voices? Towards a contemporary social theory of learning, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 25 (3), 395-408 Ingleton, C. (1999) Emotion in Learning: a neglected dynamic, Paper presented at HERDSA Annual International Conference, Melbourne, 12-15 July 1999 Katz, L. (1988) What should young children be doing? American Educator, Summer, 29-45 Katz, L. (2002) 'Not all dispositions are desirable': implications for assessment, Assessment in Education, 9 (1), 53-54 Kellaghan, T., Madaus, G. & Raczek, A. (1996) The Use of External Examinations to Improve Student Motivation, Paper presented at American Educational Research Association Conference, Washington DC Noyes, A. (2004) Learning Landscapes, British Educational Research Journal, 30 (1), 27-41 Reay, D. (2004) 'It's all becoming a habitus': beyond the habitual use of habitus in educational research, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 25 (41), 431-444 Scottish Executive (2004) A Curriculum for Excellence, Edinburgh: Scottish Executive Skidmore, D. (2006) Pedagogy and dialogue, Cambridge Journal of Education, 36(4), 503-514. Stephen, C. & Cope, P. (2003) An Inclusive Perspective on Transition to Primary School, European Educational Research Journal, 2 (2), 262-276 Stephen, C., McPake, J., Plowman, L. and Berch-Heyman, S (2008) Learning from the Children: Exploring Preschool Children's Encounters with ICT at Home, Journal of Early Childhood Research, 6 (2), 99-117 Trevarthen, C. (2001) Intrinsic Motives for Companionship in Understanding: Their Origin, Development and Significance for Infant Mental Health, Infant Mental Health Journal, 22 (1-2), 95-131 Turner, J. C., Meyer, D.K. & Schweinle, A. (2003) The importance of emotion in theories of motivation: empirical, methodological and theoretical considerations from a goal theory perspective, International Journal of Educational Research, 39, 375-393 Urdan, T. & Turner, J.C. (2005) Competence Motivation in the Classroom. In A. J. Elliot & C. S. Dweck (eds.) Handbook of Competence and Motivation, New York: Guilford Press, 297-317
dc.description.volume40
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid696
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorOberski, Iddo
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number2


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