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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Stephen D M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T15:41:37Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T15:41:37Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifierET356
dc.identifier.citationSmith, S. (2009) An action research study of Palliative Care for people with A Dementia and their carers, no. 403.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/7393
dc.descriptionThis research was undertaken with the agreement and collaboration of NHS Lothian and the West Lothian Community Health and Care Partnership. I would also like to thank the Big Lottery Fund for their funding.
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this participatory action research were to: identify the palliative care needs of PWAD and their carers in West Lothian; analyse two dementia care services as they develop practice in the assessment and management of distress for PWAD, and supporting carers; determine implications for practice development and service delivery. Multiple data collection methods were used including; focus groups, interviews, participant observation, reflective accounts, case studies, documentation review, action learning and notes recorded from meetings with staff. The first phase was a dementia palliative care needs assessment. Eight PWAD, 25 carers and 63 service providers participated in interviews and focus groups. Overall findings were that a palliative care approach provided a useful and appropriate framework to understand the needs of PWAD. Recognition of and support for family carers should take a high priority when considering a model for dementia palliative care. More specific needs were identified, these included: the need to develop person centred approaches; enhance the management of pain and distress and enhance individual support for carers. Two services participated in the action phase; a day centre and a hospital ward. Eleven people with a dementia, 28 carers and 86 service providers participated. Services focused on carer support or assessing pain / distress. Carer support findings: implementing an assessment tool enhanced staffs understanding of carers needs; carers preferred flexible and individual support interventions; family carers experienced cumulative factors that restricted access to support. Assessment of distress findings: assessing distress from the behaviour of PWAD was complex. The implementation of the Disability Distress Assessment Tool (DisDAT) identified new evidence that it provided a person centred assessment suitable for PWAD. It was identified that the theoretical concept of relationship centred care, could provide a way of working, that complemented the adoption of a palliative care approach for PWAD, whilst enhancing carer support and assessment of distress practices.
dc.format.extent403
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.subjectDementia
dc.subjectPalliative Care
dc.subjectCarer Support
dc.subjectAssessment
dc.subjectDistress
dc.titleAn action research study of Palliative Care for people with A Dementia and their carers
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultysub_nur
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid356_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophy


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