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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T15:59:17Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T15:59:17Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierET2458
dc.identifier.citationStears, A. (2016) Evaluating undergraduate students' experiences of an 8 week pilot module "Living Well with Dementia" using a Collective case studies and a Phenomenological approach., no. 90.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/7635
dc.description.abstractAim The aim of this dissertation is to evaluate students' experiences of an 8 week pilot module that provided education on person centre care in Dementia using a collective case studies and phenomenological approach. Background With an estimated 84,000 individuals living with Dementia in Scotland Caring for this increasing population will impact already fragile resources (Alzheimer Scotland 2012). In education, access to Dementia training is limited at undergraduate level (Pulsford, 2007, DOH, 2010, Alushi et al, 2015). It is imperative healthcare students' are competent at engaging with those with dementia at the point of graduation, and that these skills are embedded in their education (Alushi et al 2015, Gordon et al, 2014). Design and Methodology An 8 week on-line module with piloted with 32 undergraduate students who expressed an interest in dementia education. Data was collected using a qualitative methodology and semi structured interviews were utilised in both a focus group, and a single interview to form collective case studies. Data was then transcribed and evaluated using Ritchie and Lewis' framework (2003) for thematic and concept analysis. Results Participants identified there was a gap in the curriculum regarding dementia, however three themes emerged from the analysis. The module relevance in practice, the modules' design and delivery, and skill development. Conclusion The module was considered well designed, relevant to current practice and addressed the theory practice gap (Maben et al, 2006). It can potentially influence students critical thinking and their future clinical practice in a variety of ways. A subtle shift in thinking was evident from the biomedical approach to a more holistic and person centred view of dementia care (Furaker and Nilsson (2009). It is an important step in continuing to justify the need for dementia education in healthcare across all sectors, which will ultimately impact the care we deliver
dc.format.extent90
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleEvaluating undergraduate students' experiences of an 8 week pilot module "Living Well with Dementia" using a Collective case studies and a Phenomenological approach.
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultymsc_pred
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid2458_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


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