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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T16:05:40Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T16:05:40Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierET2058
dc.identifier.citation(2015) Training in small businesses: An employer and employee perspective., no. 78.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/7758
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to examine training practices in small businesses with between one and nine employees. Specific research on training in businesses of this size is limited, however primary research increases the understanding on the topic. Studies show training to be of crucial importance to a business. This paper ascertains why training is not more widely used. The research strategy comprised of mixed methods to provide a well-rounded research approach with the use of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. A concentration on qualitative methods, highlighted a strong awareness of an interpretivist philosophy. Convenience sampling within the Glasgow area produced eighty survey respondents and thirteen interview respondents. Analysis highlighted five key themes, the type of training in small businesses; the quantity; the barriers to training; its importance and suggested improvements. The findings provide a deeper understanding of an employee and employer perspective of small business training. On-the-job training was confirmed as the most common training approach. The majority of employees desired more training. However there was significant interest for a more formalised structure. Furthermore, a disconnect between employees and employers was highlighted. The findings were generated by both qualitative and quantitative data to reduce bias and ensure reliability. However, the nature of the research prevented generalisation to be conducted. A larger sample would allow for generalisation and would provide a more varied group of respondents, as the study concentrated on businesses within the hospitality and retail sector. Overall, the research provided a comparative perspective of employees and employers and suggests employers should listen to employees desire for more training. Education and assistance for employers would allow them to explore and understand training practices that may have been more suited to them.
dc.format.extent78
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleTraining in small businesses: An employer and employee perspective.
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultyba_busman
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid2058_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


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