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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T16:08:29Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T16:08:29Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierET1932
dc.identifier.citation(2015) Disney fairy tale adaptations are frequently stigmatized as superficial and stereotypical. Can the use of Jacques Lacan's theory of Lack and Desire give deeper insight into messages and values represented in the Disney adaptation of Beauty and the Beast?, no. 37.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/7942
dc.description.abstractThis study is an attempt to counter the frequent perception that Disney's fairy tale adaptations are superficial and stereotypical. This is done specifically through an exploration of the Disney adaptation of Beauty and the Beast. This thesis explores Disney's adaptation in depth, applying Jacques Lacan's theories of Lack and Desire to the characters Beast and Belle. As the theory of Lack and Desire is not a singular idea but woven through Lacan's many theoretical notions, this thesis covers the most important aspects of Lacanian psychoanalysis. The thesis explores the Three Orders: The Real, the Symbolic and the Imaginary Order and how desire is the part of the demand, which remains after the biological need has ended in satisfaction. This leads to an over view of the Object a, a signifier of the constant unattainable desire and the projected desire on the Other. Lastly, the gendered signifier of the phallus, the males fear of loosing the phallus and the female's masquerade of aligning female desire to male signifiers. Using these Lacanian theories this study explores the Disney adaptation of Beauty and the Beast and juxtaposes it to the original tale by Gabriele-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve. This thesis discusses the controversial ideas displayed by a Lacanian analysis such as, that Beast as the male protagonist associates himself with female characteristics and attempts to align himself with Belle's desire, whilst the female lead rejects the notion of aligning herself to any male suitor. Lack and Desire in pairing with Disney's adaptation of Beauty and the Beast provides reason to believe Lacanian theory can provide valuable insight into Disney narratives. Giving cause to re-consider and re-evaluate Disney's fairy tales and suspend previous notions of Disney adaptations.
dc.format.extent37
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleDisney fairy tale adaptations are frequently stigmatized as superficial and stereotypical. Can the use of Jacques Lacan's theory of Lack and Desire give deeper insight into messages and values represented in the Disney adaptation of Beauty and the Beast?
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultyba_dap
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid1932_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


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