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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T16:11:20Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T16:11:20Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifierET1567
dc.identifier.citation(2014) Glocalized Conflict or Global Terror? Framing the 7th July London Related Terror Attacks in U.S Print Press, no. 70.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/8117
dc.description.abstractTerrorism by both domestic and international terrorist groups presents an ongoing threat to national security. It is a term that citizens of nations across the globe are used to hearing and reading daily across all platforms of media. This study examines the coverage of the 2005 London terrorists attack in the U.S. print media. Previous studies conclude international news is predominantly absent from the American press unless the news is primarily of conflict or disaster on a great scale. Historically, previous coverage of terror attacks on non-American soil has had tendencies to distance international wars and conflicts. However, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 gave birth to a new media narrative: the War on Terror. The War on Terror narrative was created to explain international security and global conflict from a global perspective. It is this change in nature of American media discourse on terrorism that establishes the background for this study. The use of media framing and emphasis on selected aspects of an event - while demonstrating blunt ignorance of others - is used to establish selected narratives in the reportage of the London attack. Frames are critical in determining audience reception of a story, while also being an imperative tool in the comprehension of an event. Investigation of two major narratives: endemic internal conflict and the War on Terror concludes that while the War on Terror frame is widely used, it is the dominant meta-narrative within which conflict framing may occur. Regardless of any rhetoric meta-narrative, coverage of the London attacks in the U.S. print press is still found to have a considerable nationalistic slant.
dc.format.extent70
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleGlocalized Conflict or Global Terror? Framing the 7th July London Related Terror Attacks in U.S Print Press
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultyba_filmmed
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid1567_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


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