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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T16:23:35Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T16:23:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifierET2726
dc.identifier.citation(2017) An exploration of the 'Partnering for Change' model as a strategy to address participation for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder., no. 90.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/8559
dc.description.abstractDevelopmental coordination disorder affects 5-8.5% of children aged 5-11 in the United Kingdom. Children with developmental coordination disorder can experience motor impairments, reduced participation in everyday occupations and are liable to develop social and psychological issues such as anxiety, depression and reduced self efficacy. The Scottish Government supports early intervention to identify and support wellbeing for children experiencing difficulties such as developmental coordination disorder. Traditionally children with developmental coordination disorder are diagnosed when they start to attend school. They are then referred to occupational therapy services in order to receive individualised treatment. Partnering for Change is a Canadian based model with potential for implementation within the United Kingdom. The model recognises the need for early identification, the collaborative management of symptoms and the promotion of participation. This in turn helps to prevent secondary issues arising for children with developmental coordination disorder. Partnering for Change supports collaborative practice between occupational therapists, teachers, parents and children. This provides support that enables increased participation in everyday activities at school, at home and in the community. The literature review identifies reduced participation as a concern for children with developmental coordination disorder, demonstrates the effects and consequences of reduced participation and how effective school based models are in combating these consequences. The proposed research aims to explore the perspectives of parents and teachers by using focus groups, when considering the use of Partnering for Change. In order to address reduced participation for children with developmental coordination disorder within United Kingdom primary schools.
dc.format.extent90
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleAn exploration of the 'Partnering for Change' model as a strategy to address participation for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultybsc_occ
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid2726_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


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