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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T16:25:08Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T16:25:08Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierET1986
dc.identifier.citation(2015) Trolls are going to troll: A look at flame trolling responses on twitter, no. 89.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/8666
dc.description.abstractFlame trolling has become a common phenomenon amongst online communication and has been covered widely by the media. Previous studies have found that vulnerable and minority groups such as women and feminists are more likely to be targeted by flame trolls who gain a lot of enjoyment from sending offensive and threatening messages. However there has been little research focussed on the form and construction of trolling. This study wanted to investigate what types of negative responses a high profile Twitter user's posts received. The study also looked in detail at the form and construction of these responses. What was found from analysing the data was that the different types of posts that the user tweeted did appear to receive different types of responses. The responses mainly contained derogatory language regarding her gender, attacks against her intelligence as well as threats and wishes of physical and sexual violence against her.
dc.format.extent89
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleTrolls are going to troll: A look at flame trolling responses on twitter
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultybsc_Psy
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid1986_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


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