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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T16:25:15Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T16:25:15Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifierET2877
dc.identifier.citation(2017) An exploration of the potential relationships between attachment style, prejudice, and the acceptability of hate speech., no. 71.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/8697
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the current study was to explore the potential relationships between subtle and blatant prejudice, attachment style, and hate speech acceptability. This research employed a quantitative methodology. Participants completed an online survey consisting of the Subtle and Blatant Prejudice Scale which measured personal subtly and blatantly prejudiced attitudes, the Experiences in Close Relationships Questionnaire - Revised which measured anxious and avoidant attachment, and the Attitudes Towards Censorship - Revised scale which measured attitudes towards hate speech acceptability. Multiple regression analysis showed a small significant relationship between attachment anxiety and blatant prejudice, but not subtle prejudice. High acceptability of hate speech attitudes was found to be significantly associated with both subtle prejudice and sex. The results suggest that current conceptualisations of prejudice within the literature are rather vague and that future prejudice research including hate speech acceptability may make insightful contributions regarding the psychological underpinnings of prejudice as a whole.
dc.format.extent71
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleAn exploration of the potential relationships between attachment style, prejudice, and the acceptability of hate speech.
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultybsc_Psy
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid2877_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


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