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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T16:25:54Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T16:25:54Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifierET1630
dc.identifier.citation(2014) Cyber-bullying reported to have resulted in suicide: An analysis of print media coverage, no. 67.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/8735
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this research is to determine how different print media styles portray cyber-bullying reported to have resulted in suicide. Analysing how the print media portray the issue is essential because of the research, which evidences the influence the print media have, on individuals and their perceptions, as well as understandings of phenomena. For instance, some of the risks relating to how the print media report cases of suicide are outcomes, such as, copycat or imitation suicides. This is noted, particularly, in instances where the newspaper sensationalises the story. The findings of this study are a valuable resource for future research. Future studies can utilise the media's portrayals, which this study has evidenced, to then investigate how individuals in society interpret these portrayals. The thematic analysis of the two most-read tabloids and two most-read broadsheets reveal through comparison four key themes; word choice, stylized presentation, anonymity and the technology age gap. Each theme suggests that the broadsheets and tabloids differently portray cyber-bullying reported to have resulted in suicide.
dc.format.extent67
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleCyber-bullying reported to have resulted in suicide: An analysis of print media coverage
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultyba_psysoc
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid1630_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


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