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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T16:28:09Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T16:28:09Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifierET2853
dc.identifier.citation(2017) A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW ON THE EFFECTS OF SLEEP ON COMMUNICATION WITHIN NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, no. 111.
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/8848
dc.description.abstractAn initial review has shown the adverse effects that sleep disturbance has on communication in typically developing people, with even one poor night's sleep capable of producing a noticeable deterioration in communicative ability. Research has also been done to better understand sleep and its disorders along with the ways in which such sleep disturbance can impact the different ways people communicate. Neurodevelopmental disorders are a part of the speech and language therapy case load and their complex etiologies and symptoms, including sleep and communication problems, are an ever growing area of interest. This study aims to systematically review the relevant literature to better understand the sleep and communication presentations within neurodevelopmental disorders, as well as to look at the effects that sleep disorders have on communication in this particular group of people. Three databases were searched using specific search terms relevant to the study. The articles found were assessed using a screening process to ensure they were suitable for the study. This left 36 journal articles selected for data extraction and analysis. Overall, a range of sleep disorders and communication problems were found to be common in individuals with Neurodevelopmental Disorders. Sleep disorders were positively correlated with communication problems in a number of Neurodevelopmental disorders e.g. total sleep duration and communication problems, such as behavioural difficulties. A definite causal relationship between sleep and communication disorders could not be established in this study, although the positive effect of treatments for sleep on communication are indicative. The need for and potential nature of further research in this area is explored. The correlations should, however, be considered when looking at clinical practice, so that speech and language therapists take account of an individual's sleep difficulties as well as their communication ones during assessment and therapy.
dc.format.extent111
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleA SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW ON THE EFFECTS OF SLEEP ON COMMUNICATION WITHIN NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultybsc_Spe
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid2853_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


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