Show simple item record

dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T16:31:35Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T16:31:35Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierET1972
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/8873
dc.description.abstractCommonly associated with attachment dimension, individuals actively employ emotion regulation strategies, such as suppression. Despite suppression rendering the individual emotionally neutral in appearance, analysis of its self-regulatory demands suggest that it may come at a cognitive cost. 60 students at Queen Margaret University took part in a correlational study which examined the effect of suppression on memory for concurrent events, in relation to attachment dimension. Relationships between main study variables were explored using correlations and regression analysis. In support of previous literature, associations between trait suppression and attachment avoidance were found, trait suppression accounted for an estimated 18.7% of variance in avoidance scores. Conversely, no significant relationship between suppression and episodic memory was discovered. It could therefore be argued that emotion regulation is so overtly learned by adulthood that it has no significant effect on cognition. Future research is necessary to assess spontaneous regulation in more dynamic interpersonal contexts.
dc.format.extent64
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University
dc.titleEffects of emotion suppression upon memory with reference to attachment dimension
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultyNO DIVISION
dc.description.ispublishedunpub
dc.description.eprintid1972_etheses
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.description.statusunpub


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record