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dc.contributor.authorPieczka, Magdaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWood, Emmaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCasteltrione, Isidoropaoloen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-15T10:57:51Z
dc.date.available2018-10-15T10:57:51Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-31
dc.identifier.citationPieczka, M., Wood, E. and Casteltrione, I. (2016) The AlcoLOLs project: Final report, March 2016. Edinburgh: Queen Margaret University.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/8988
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.qmu.ac.uk/services-for-business-and-industry/ref-young-people-and-alcohol-peer-learning-through-dialogue/
dc.descriptionSchools involved in the project: Portobello High School, Castlebrae High School, Drummond Community High School, Holy Rood RC High School, Leith Academy and Trinity Academy.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis report evaluates the AlcoLOLs project, funded by the Robertson Trust and conducted in Edinburgh 2013-2015. The project was designed to tackle the issues alcohol presents for young people and worked by combining insights from dialogue, peer education, and a harm reduction approach. The intervention was co-designed by young people and implemented by them in six secondary schools in the North East of Edinburgh, eventually reaching over 3000 young people. The AlcoLOLs, a name they chose for themselves, were volunteers who experienced dialogue at Queen Margaret University where they received training in facilitation and education about alcohol. Subsequently, the AlcoLOLs ran their own dialogue groups in schools, meeting each group of approximately 15 pupils twice and reaching on average 1000 pupils a year. School dialogue groups were designed to problematize alcohol, question participants’ attitudes and behaviours, offer useful knowledge, develop new communication skills to support learning, resilience, and, where appropriate, aspire to change behaviours. Our approach was: to treat alcohol consumption as a social, cultural practice; to acknowledge that persuasion and information-giving were insufficient communication methods to tackle the issue: and to adopt a harm reduction — pragmatic and non-judgmental — way of working. The AlcoLOLs project, consequently, was designed around dialogue and peer-learning and it demonstrably delivered a range of beneficial outcomes for participants: new skills and knowledge, change of attitudes and behaviours (effective self-regulation), and the promise of a potentially larger-scale cultural transformation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by The Robertson Trust.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.qmu.ac.uk/services-for-business-and-industry/ref-young-people-and-alcohol-peer-learning-through-dialogue/en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University, Edinburghen_US
dc.subjectDialogueen_US
dc.subjectAlcoholen_US
dc.subjectTeenage Drinking Cultureen_US
dc.subjectScotlanden_US
dc.titleAlcoLOLs Project: Final report, March 2016en_US
dc.title.alternativeAlcoLOLs: Re-thinking Drinkingen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-03-01
rioxxterms.typeOtheren_US
rioxxterms.publicationdate2016-03-31
refterms.depositExceptionNAen_US
refterms.accessExceptionNAen_US
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
qmu.authorQueen Margaret University, Edinburghen_US
qmu.authorRobertson Trusten_US
qmu.authorPieczka, Magda
qmu.authorWood, Emma
qmu.authorCasteltrione, Isidoropaolo
qmu.centreCentre for Communication, Cultural and Media Studiesen_US
refterms.versionVoRen_US
refterms.dateDeposit2018-10-15


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