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dc.contributor.authorEdge, Isabelleen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-05T09:07:03Z
dc.date.available2019-02-05T09:07:03Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/9233
dc.description.abstractPurpose The purpose of this study is to look into why there are not more women in senior levels of management within businesses, and more specifically investigating the challenges they may face in reaching the upper levels of management. The data collected will be analysed to determine the areas of biggest challenge to women’s progression. Design and Methodology A qualitative approach was selected for this dissertation, with semi-structured interviews chosen as the data collection method. Twelve women, of any age, from across the UK, were selected as the sample, from a range of backgrounds from Team Manager, to Heads of Department, to Executive Director, to give a wide scope for analysis of the challenges faced by these women. Findings The findings within this study have shown that there are several main themes and challenges that can hold women back from reaching upper levels of management; their own confidence issues and imposter syndrome, family roles and acceptability of paternity leave, unconscious bias and second-generation gender bias, perception of masculine and feminine traits in managers, and lack role models higher up in the company to aspire to.en
dc.titleAn Investigation into the Challenges Women in Managerial Roles Face in Reaching Higher Levels of Management.en
dc.typeThesis


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