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dc.rights.licenseAvailable under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
dc.contributor.authorFox, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Simon C.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, Sianen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-20T13:10:44Z
dc.date.available2019-02-20T13:10:44Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-10
dc.identifier.citationFox, C., Hunter, S. C. & Jones, S. (2015) The relationship between peer victimization and children’s humor styles: It’s no laughing matter! Social Development, 24 (3), pp. 443-461.en
dc.identifier.issn1467-9507en
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/9357
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sode.12099
dc.descriptionSian Jones - ORCID: 0000-0002-2399-1017 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2399-1017en
dc.descriptionItem previously deposited in Keele University repository on 28 October 2015 at: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/1089 and in University of Strathclyde (Strathprints) repository on 1 June 2015 at: https://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/53174
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Fox, C., Hunter, S. C. & Jones, S. (2015) The relationship between peer victimization and children’s humor styles: It’s no laughing matter! Social Development, 24 (3), pp. 443-461., which has been published in final form at: https://doi.org/10.1111/sode.12099. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the concurrent and prospective (fall to spring) associations between peer victimization and four humor styles, two of which are adaptive (affiliative and self‐enhancing) and two maladaptive (aggressive and self‐defeating). Participants were 1234 adolescents (52 percent female) aged 11–13 years, drawn from six secondary schools in England. Self‐reports and peer reports of peer victimization were collected, as were self‐reports of humor styles. In cross‐sectional analyses, peer victimization was associated with all four humor styles, most strongly with self‐defeating and affiliative humor. Across the school year, peer victimization was associated with an increase in self‐defeating humor and a decrease in affiliative humor (and vice‐versa). These results have implications for models of humor development and how we understand the continuity of peer victimization.en
dc.description.sponsorshipEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Grant Number: RES‐062‐23‐2647en
dc.format.extent443-461en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Developmenten
dc.rights© 2014 The Authors
dc.subjectVictimizationen
dc.subjectBullyingen
dc.subjectLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subjectHumoren
dc.titleThe relationship between peer victimization and children’s humor styles: It’s no laughing matter!en
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-04
dc.description.volume24en
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2014-11-10
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorJones, Sianen
qmu.centreCentre for Applied Social Sciencesen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number3en
refterms.versionAMen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-02-20


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