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dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution (CC BY 3.0) License
dc.contributor.authorFox, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Simon C.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, Sianen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-23T16:01:35Z
dc.date.available2019-02-23T16:01:35Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-19
dc.identifier.citationFox, C., Hunter, S. C., & Jones, S. (2016) Longitudinal associations between humor styles and psychosocial adjustment in adolescence. Europe's Journal of Psychology, 12 (3), pp. 377-389.en
dc.identifier.issn1841-0413en
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/9370
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.5964/ejop.v12i3.1065
dc.descriptionSian Jones - ORCID: 0000-0002-2399-1017 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2399-1017en
dc.descriptionItem previously deposited in Goldsmiths, University of London repository on 27 January 2016 at: http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/16369 and in University of Strathclyde (Strathprints) repository on 29 April 2016 at: https://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/56250 and in Keele University repository on 25 July 2016 at: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/2057
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the concurrent and prospective associations between psychosocial adjustment and four humor styles, two of which are adaptive (affiliative, self-enhancing) and two maladaptive (aggressive, self-defeating). Participants were 1,234 adolescents (52% female) aged 11-13 years, drawn from six secondary schools in England. Self-reports of psychosocial adjustment (loneliness, depressive symptomatology, and self-esteem) and humor styles were collected at two time points (fall and summer). In cross-lagged panel analyses, self-defeating humor was associated with an increase in both depressive symptoms and loneliness, and with a decrease in self-esteem. In addition, depressive symptoms predicted an increase in the use of self-defeating humor over time, indicating that these may represent a problematic spiral of thoughts and behaviors. Self-esteem was associated with an increase in the use of affiliative humor over the school year but not vice-versa. These results inform our understanding of the ways in which humor is associated with psychosocial adjustment in adolescence.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by a grant from the Economic and Social Research Council (REF: RES-062-23-2647)en
dc.description.urihttps://ejop.psychopen.eu/article/view/1065/htmlen
dc.format.extent377-389en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPsychOpenen
dc.relation.ispartofEurope's Journal of Psychologyen
dc.rights© 2015 The Authors
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectHumoren
dc.subjectPsychosocial Adjustmenten
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectLonelinessen
dc.subjectSelf-esteemen
dc.subjectAdolescenceen
dc.titleLongitudinal associations between humor styles and psychosocial adjustment in adolescenceen
dc.title.alternativeReciprocity between humor styles and psychosocial adjustment in children
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-12-19
dc.description.volume12en
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2016-08-19
refterms.dateFCA2019-02-23
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOA
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorJones, Sianen
qmu.centreCentre for Applied Social Sciencesen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number3en
refterms.versionVoRen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-02-23


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Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 3.0) License
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 3.0) License