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dc.contributor.authorMansour, Jamal K.en
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Claire M.en
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Matthew T.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-18T16:12:12Z
dc.date.available2018-12-18T16:12:12Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-21
dc.identifierhttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/20.500.12289/9582/9582aam.pdf
dc.identifier.citationMansour, J. K., Hamilton, C. M. (2018) Understanding the weapon focus effect: The role of threat, unusualness, exposure duration, and scene complexity. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 33(6), pp. 991-1007.en
dc.identifier.issn1099-0720en
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/9582
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3515
dc.descriptionAcknowledgements - The first author would also like to acknowledge the efforts of the following students who contributed to this project: Zach Blaikie, Dani Cernicchiaro, Ryan Kane, Tom McGuire, Courtnay Pollock, Kirsty Stewart, and Lorna White. In addition, the authors would like to acknowledge the individuals who volunteered their time to act in the videos used in this research.en
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Mansour, J. K., Hamilton, C. M. (2018) Understanding the weapon focus effect: The role of threat, unusualness, exposure duration, and scene complexity. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 33(6), pp. 991-1007, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3515. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
dc.descriptionJamal K. Mansour - ORCID: 0000-0001-7162-8493 https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7162-8493
dc.description.abstractWe examined the role of exposure duration and scene complexity on the weapon focus effect (WFE). Memory for the mock crime was affected more by a weapon than an unusual but nonthreatening object. Threat reduced correct identifications when the event was short but not long; duration of the event did not interact with unusualness. Additionally, we found a WFE for target‐absent lineup decisions, but only for the accomplice lineup, not the object‐wielding perpetrator's lineup. We discuss the implications of these results for illuminating the mechanisms that elicit the WFE.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by a grant from the Centre for Applied Social Sciences, Queen Margaret University to the first author.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Cognitive Psychologyen
dc.subjectDurationen
dc.subjectEyewitnessen
dc.subjectScene Complexityen
dc.subjectUnusual Object Effecten
dc.subjectWeapon Focus Effecten
dc.titleUnderstanding the weapon focus effect: The role of threat, unusualness, exposure duration, and scene complexityen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-12-14
dc.date.updated2019-03-11
dc.description.volume33
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2018-12-21
refterms.dateEmbargoEnd2019-12-21
refterms.dateFCA2019-12-21
refterms.dateFCD2018-12-18
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorMansour, Jamal K.en
qmu.centreCentre for Applied Social Sciencesen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number6
refterms.versionAMen
refterms.dateDeposit2018-12-18
refterms.dateFreeToRead2019-12-21
refterms.dateFreeToDownload2019-12-21
refterms.dateToSearch2019-12-21


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