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dc.contributor.authorGleeson, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorNaish, P. F.
dc.contributor.authorWilcock, J. E.
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:45:30Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:45:30Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifierER971
dc.identifier.citationGleeson, N., Naish, P., Wilcock, J. & Mercer, T. (2002) Reliability of indices of neuromuscular leg performance in end-stage renal failure, Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, vol. 34, , pp. 273-277,
dc.identifier.issn1650-1977
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/165019702760390365
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/971
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the day-to-day reproducibility and single measurement reliability of peak force, time to half peak force and rate of force development indices of knee extension neuromuscular performance in patients with end-stage renal failure. Eleven self-selected patients (6 men, 5 women) receiving maintenance dialysis (dialysis history 67 42.8 month) completed 3 inter-day assessment sessions. Each comprised a standardized warm-up and 3 intermittent static maximal voluntary actions of the knee extensors of the preferred limb (45 knee flexion angle [0 = full knee extension]) using a specially-constructed dynamometer. Repeated measures ANOVA of coefficient of variation scores revealed significant differences between indices in their reproducibility across day-to-day trials. Post-hoc comparisons of group mean scores suggested that peak force (6.6 3.0%) offers significantly greater measurement reproducibility than time to half peak force (16.8 9.5%) or rate of force development (20.3 12.1%). Intraclass correlation coefficients and standard error of measurement scores showed that single-trial assessments of peak force, time to half peak force and rate of force development would demonstrate limited precision and capability to discriminate subtle intra-subject or inter-subject changes in neuromuscular performance.
dc.format.extent273-277
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Rehabilitation Medicine
dc.subjectDialysis
dc.subjectNeuromuscular Performance
dc.subjectReliability
dc.titleReliability of indices of neuromuscular leg performance in end-stage renal failure
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_phy
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dc.description.volume34
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.1080/165019702760390365
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid971
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorMercer, Tom
qmu.authorGleeson, Nigel
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number6


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