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dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Daviden
dc.contributor.editorEriksson, Birgiten
dc.contributor.editorStage, Carstenen
dc.contributor.editorValtysson, Bjarkien
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T11:22:33Z
dc.date.available2019-05-21T11:22:33Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationStevenson, D. (2019) The “problem” of participation in cultural policy. In: Eriksson, B., Stage, C. & Valtysson, B. (eds.) Cultures of Participation: Arts, Digital Media & Cultural Institutions (Routledge Research in Cultural and Media Studies). London: Routledge, (In Press).en
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/9745
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.routledge.com/culturalstudies/series/SE0304
dc.descriptionDavid Stevenson - ORCID: 0000-0002-8977-1818 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8977-1818en
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Cultures of Participation: Arts, Digital Media & Cultural Institutions on [date of publication], available online: http://www.routledge.com/[BOOK ISBN URL]
dc.descriptionBook title record deposited in Aarhus University repository, available at: https://pure.au.dk/portal/en/publications/cultures-of-participation(3c45da5c-d19b-469a-84cd-4f75a84b4a39).html
dc.description.abstractThe need to increase recorded rates of cultural participation has become a recurring trope within cultural policy discourse. Internationally governments have commissioned research to measure who takes part in different cultural activities and developed policy initiatives to address perceived failings (see UNESCO Institute for Statistics, 2012 on international approaches). Commonly this assumes that the cultural offer is beyond reproach, but it is the participant who must change in order to be able to take up the opportunities that are on offer. In other words certain patterns of cultural participation are represented as a problem caused by a deficit amongst individuals and state intervention is needed to build the capacity of individuals to take part in what is represented as mainstream culture (Miles and Gibson, 2017). In Denmark for instance, despite government surveys demonstrating high and stable rates of participation in civic activities, declining rates in specific art forms such as theatre and classical music are still seen as a problem for cultural policy to solve (Jancovich and Hansen, 2018).en
dc.description.sponsorshipAcknowledgements: the authors gratefully acknowledge funding for this research from the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)en
dc.description.urihttps://www.routledge.com/culturalstudies/series/SE0304en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.ispartofCultures of Participation: Arts, Digital Media & Cultural Institutionsen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRoutledge Research in Cultural and Media Studies
dc.titleThe “problem” of participation in cultural policyen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-05-08
dc.description.ispublishedinpress
rioxxterms.typeBook chapteren
rioxxterms.publicationdate2019
refterms.dateFCD2019-05-21
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorStevenson, Daviden
qmu.centreCentre for Communication, Cultural and Media Studiesen
dc.description.statusinpress
refterms.versionAMen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-05-21


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