Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKnowles, Kristen K.en
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Anthony C.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-08T10:17:38Z
dc.date.available2019-08-08T10:17:38Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-31
dc.identifier.citationKnowles, K. K. & Little, A. C. (2019) Leadership perception in candidate faces: Scotland’s unionists prefer dominant leaders, and so do nationalists – but only if they are economic pessimists. Scottish Affairs, 28(4), pp. 434-458.en
dc.identifier.issn2053-888Xen
dc.identifier.issn0966-0356
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/9891
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3366/scot.2019.0297
dc.descriptionKristen K. Knowles - ORCID 0000-0001-9664-9055 https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9664-9055en
dc.description.abstractVoters rely on many cues to make decisions about who to vote for, and the appearance of a potential leader can play an important part in this decision-making process. When choosing leaders, it is thought that voters make “fit-to-task” voting decisions, for example, exhibiting a preference for masculine-looking leaders in hypothetical wartime scenarios, when masculine behavioural characteristics would be most valued. Here, we examine face preferences within a sample of Scottish voters during the campaign for the 2014 Scottish independence referendum. Subjects were presented with masculinised and feminised versions of faces in a forced-choice experimental task to select their preferred face in a hypothetical national election. No voters (those who voted to maintain the Union) chose more masculine-faced hypothetical leaders than Yes voters (those who voted in favour of an independent Scotland); effect sizes observed were medium. Within Yes voters, economic concern was related to a preference for masculine faces, but for No voters, economic outlook did not relate to face preferences. These findings underscore the importance of real-world socio-political contexts in psychology research, particularly that concerning the public perception of different leadership prototypes. Implications in the current Scottish context are discussed.en
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3366/scot.2019.0297en
dc.format.extent434-458
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEdinburgh University Pressen
dc.relation.ispartofScottish Affairsen
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Edinburgh University Press in Scottish Affairs. The Version of Record is available online at: https://doi.org/10.3366/scot.2019.0297
dc.subjectMasculinityen
dc.subjectDominanceen
dc.subjectLeadershipen
dc.subjectEconomic Outlooken
dc.subjectPolitical Psychologyen
dc.titleLeadership perception in candidate faces: Scotland’s unionists prefer dominant leaders, and so do nationalists – but only if they are economic pessimistsen
dc.title.alternativeUnionists prefer dominant leadersen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-08-07
dc.date.updated2019-12-12
dc.description.volume28
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
refterms.dateFCD2019-08-08
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorKnowles, Kristen K.en
qmu.centreCentre for Applied Social Sciencesen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number4
refterms.versionAMen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-08-08


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record