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dc.contributor.authorElliott, Amandaen
dc.contributor.authorFinkel, Rebeccaen
dc.contributor.editorWalters, Trudieen
dc.contributor.editorJepson, Allan Stewarten
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-09T13:13:57Z
dc.date.available2019-08-09T13:13:57Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-08
dc.identifier.citationElliott, A. & Finkel, R. (2019) Barriers to access: Investigation of plus-size women consumer experiences at fashion events. In: Walters, T. & Jepsen, A. S. (eds.) Marginalisation and events. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, pp. 179-192.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780429506697en
dc.identifier.isbn9781138583566
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/9898
dc.identifier.urihttp://sierra.qmu.ac.uk/record=b5406840
dc.descriptionFinkel, Rebecca - ORCID 0000-0003-2120-6211 https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2120-6211en
dc.description.abstractRecent cross-disciplinary literature in the social sciences has shown that fat women experience weight bias and marginalisation in nearly all aspects of life, including within the fashion industry. This stigmatisation results in exclusion from brand and designer collections, runway shows, and other fashion events. As research in this area and in particular within an event context is very scarce, this chapter draws upon accessibility research, fat studies, and critical events studies to investigate the physical and psychological barriers to access for plus-size women at fashion events along with consumer attitudes with regard to fashion events. Research methods adopt quantitative approaches and include a survey of plus-size women who have attended a fashion event in 2017, which allowed for analysis of their experiences with regard to accessibility obstacles as well as their attitudes regarding fashion events and fashion event managers. Findings reveal plus-size consumers are more likely to attend fashion events if they see their body types represented in promotional event materials. They are also more likely to attend if they believe their needs will be met by the event facilities. Consumer attitudes toward fashion events and fashion event managers were generally negative, but provided several opportunities for growth and improvement.en
dc.description.urihttps://www.routledge.com/Marginalisation-and-Events-1st-Edition/Walters-Jepson/p/book/9780429506697en
dc.format.extent179-192
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.ispartofMarginalisation and eventsen
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Marginalisation and events on 8 Jan 2019, available online: http://www.routledge.com/9780429506697
dc.titleBarriers to access: Investigation of plus-size women consumer experiences at fashion eventsen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeBook chapteren
refterms.dateEmbargoEnd2020-07-08
refterms.dateFCD2019-08-09
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorFinkel, Rebeccaen
qmu.centreCentre for Applied Social Sciencesen
dc.description.statuspub
refterms.versionAMen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-08-09


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