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dc.contributor.authorWhite, J D
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, C
dc.contributor.authorDeplacido, C G
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, B
dc.contributor.authorSteenkamp, E H
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-14T00:46:53Z
dc.date.available2019-08-14T00:46:53Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-31
dc.date.submitted2018-11-29
dc.identifierpubmed: 31365091
dc.identifierpii: 5542119
dc.identifierdoi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdz085
dc.identifier.citationJournal of public health (Oxford, England)
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/9904
dc.descriptionFrom PubMed via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2018-11-29, revised 2019-06-17, accepted 2019-07-03
dc.descriptionPublication status: aheadofprint
dc.description.abstractThe population of older people in residential homes is projected to rise. There are unrecognized hearing difficulties among residents and prevalence of hearing loss in this population is underreported. This can result in an overestimation of levels of cognitive impairment. Untreated hearing loss is associated with social isolation, depression, disruptive behaviour and cognitive decline. This study aimed to explore the provision of hearing care (hearing assessment, rehabilitation and staff training) in Scottish care homes for older people. A survey comprising 18 questions was distributed to the managers (or designated staff members) of 659 care homes across Scotland. Responses were obtained from 154 care homes. The results support existing evidence that hearing is not assessed in the majority of homes, resulting in under detection of hearing loss. Staff lack training in supporting residents' hearing needs. Access to hearing care in residential homes differs across health board areas. There is an urgent requirement for hearing assessment of older adults on admission to residential care. Care providers require this information to construct effective care plans and mitigate the effects of hearing loss. Those responsible for providing hearing rehabilitation services require information about service users to address any unmet need. [Abstract copyright: © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.]
dc.languageeng
dc.sourceeissn: 1741-3850
dc.subjectaccess inequality
dc.subjectaural rehabilitation
dc.subjecthearing assessment
dc.subjecthearing loss
dc.subjectolder adults
dc.subjectresidential home
dc.subjectstaff training
dc.titleInequality in access to hearing care for older adults in residential homes.
dc.typearticle
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-07-03
dc.date.updated2019-08-14T00:46:52Z


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